Allen Pryor of Georgia

I was looking at the Allen Pryor who appears in Green County, GA records. I was wondering if there were one, two or even more Allen Pryors and how many of them overlapped in family trees. I wasn’t able to determine how many Allen’s but hopefully this sheds some light on Allen for people who are working on this tree.

Allen Prior married Elizabeth Cole in 1799 in Greene County, GA. In 1808 John Cole signed his will (although it wasn’t recorded until 1821). He named his daughter Elizabeth Pryor as an heir and left her $1. (My grandpa would’ve said “don’t spent that all in one place!”)

Allen Pryor was named in a court case by plaintiffs George Tuggle and Duke Cole, the executors of his father-in-law’s estate.

1809 Court Case – George Tuggle and Duke Cole are the executors of John Cole’s estate, which includes Lucy, valued at $500, and her three children, each worth $200. The petitioners claim that in December of the previous year, they “casually lost” the slave, who fell into the possession of Allen PRYOR. They allege that although Pryor knew that the slaves were their property, he “converted the said negroes to his own use.” They sue for $2,000 in damages

Pryor in turn sued his brother-in-law Duke Cole for depriving him of the use of the slaves from his in-laws’ estate.

1810 Court Case – Allen PRYOR was the owner of four slaves, Lucy and her three children, Judy, Jacob and Jane. He contends, however, that the slaves were taken out of his possession and they ended up in the possession of Duke Cole “by finding.” Pryor claims that Cole intended to deceive him by not returning the slaves and that he has “converted & disposed of the said goods & Chattels to his own use.” Pryor claims damages of $1,500, and asks that Cole be required to appear in the Superior Court to answer his allegations.

The court appearance dockets are online at Ancestry.com. They aren’t indexed. And they aren’t in chronological order. Yep, they’re a barrel of fun! However, I was able to find two cases involving Allen Pryor. There’s no 1810 census so these records are helpful in placing Allen in this locale.

The case of Coles Executors vs. Pryor was dismissed in the May 1810 Court (Greene Co., GA). These were the 1809 and 1810 legal issues noted above.

There was also an Indictment against Allen Pryor brought at March Term 1809.

1809: The State vs. Allen Pryor
Indictments at September Term 1811

It looks like the State’s indictment was dismissed at the Sept. 1811 hearing because the slaves were determined to be “runaway.”

There was an Allen Prior who married Sallie Thornton in 1816 in Clarke County, GA. I now have to put forth that these are possibly two different Allen Priors. Possibly. If John Cole wrote his will in 1808 then it’s possible that if his daughter died between 1808 and 1816, that his son-in-law Allen Prior could have been free to marry Sallie in 1816.